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  • UK students to deliver presentations on historic homes of Danville

  • A group of students from the University of Kentucky have spent the last semester researching a handful of historic homes in Danville. They will be speaking about their findings this Thursday, December 15 in the Community Room of the Boyle County Public Library from 4:00 to 6:30 PM. Light refreshments will be served. 
     
    Throughout the fall 2016 semester, Travis Rose and Dr. Julie Riesenweber's students have conducted preservation field work and research. Riesenweber's Documentation of Historic Buildings & Sites (HP 612) and American Architecture I (HP 610) classes spent the semester researching Danville history in the form of historic homes. In HP 612, students looked at the history of these historic homes, traced the ownership back on each house, and explored the owners of the homes through census and tax records; in HP 610 the students examined and interpreted the architecture of the homes. 
     
    Riesenweber's students have researched the Bass House (circa 1843), West Lexington Ave; Bowman- Letcher House (1850), East Lexington Ave.; JC Randolf House (1860), West Lexington Ave; Boyle House (1856), Maple Ave; Sandifor House (1848), East Lexington Ave; and frame house, East Lexington Ave.

    Rose's Historical Structural Systems & Building Materials (HP613) class worked with the owners of the Clay Building, 311 W. Main St. The class visited Danville during a field trip to explore the details of the Clay building such as flooring, roof framing, windows, stair constructions, and more. Rose's students will be presenting a conservation assessment on the Clay Building.

    "I really appreciate the expertise they bring to the table and the interest they have shown in our community," said Nicholas Wade, interim director of the Heart of Danville. "Danville has a spirit for preservation, and I am glad we are able to provide firsthand experience to the next generation of preservationists."
     
    This interest in Danville and firsthand experience will continue as additional classes have already begun work on new projects for the spring 2017 semester.